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symmetrical loop of A Pretzel




Most pretzels have a signature shape that resembles a knot. The pretzel’s unique shape is a symmetrical loop created by intertwining the ends of a long strip of dough and then folding them back on each other, forming a “pretzel loop”


Legend has it that the pretzel was invented by an Italian monk baker in the year 610 A.D.

Christians of the day prayed with their arms folded across their chests, each hand on the opposite shoulder. It occurred to him that he could twist the leftover dough from the bread into this shape and use it as a treat for the children to recite their prayers. he supposedly folded strips of bread dough to resemble the crossed arms of praying children. He called his creation pretiola, which in Latin meant “little rewards." The monk would twist the leftover dough from the bread into this shape and use it as a treat for the children to recite their prayers.


The three holes represented the Holy Trinity. In the centuries following. The pretzel made its way into history books and European culture. By 1440 the pretzel's form was a symbol of good luck, long life, and prosperity.


Since the days of beer gardens and saloons, the pretzel and the peanut has climbed the ladder of respectability, although the disposing of the peanut shell on the floor is no longer acceptable. Today pretzels come in all shapes and sizes, flavored and unflavored, salted, and unsalted and are still one of North America’s most popular snacks.


Further, it is thought that the term “tying the knot” originated in Switzerland in 1614 when Royal couples wished for happiness with a pretzel forming the nuptial knot – much like we use a wish bone today. The bride and groom would tug at a pretzel like a wishbone, the larger piece assured the spouses fulfillment of their wishes.


The Pennsylvania Dutch, brought pretzels to America in 1710. They were originally called “bretzel”. The first commercial pretzel bakery was established in the town of ititz, Pennsylvania by Julius Sturgis in 1861.

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